Posts tagged ‘Eggs’

March 28, 2013

The Deviled Egg Tray and Easter – It’s a Southern Thing

by Crystal Cook

In the deep South, some things are just a given.  For instance, every type of soda is always (and I mean ALWAYS) a Coke®, all tea is sweet tea, and you always will find a deviled egg tray in the cupboard. Over the years, my deviled egg tray has brought me much joy.  At times when I could not get home to Georgia for the holidays, breaking out my tray and making a batch of eggs was a simple way to bring the spirit of home to me.

Below is my favorite twist on the southern deviled egg recipe. I highly suggest that you make them a part of your appetizer spread this Easter.

Enjoy, and now go call your momma!

Southern (as in the South of France)  Deviled Eggs

  • 12 hard-cooked large eggs, shelled
  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon chopped pitted kalamata olives
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 tablespoon chopped sun-dried tomatoes (dry, not packed in oil)
  • 2 teaspoons chopped capers
  • 1 teaspoon dried herbs de Provence
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1/4  teaspoon salt
  • 1/4  teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • Additional chopped fresh parsley for garnish

Ok, so the hardest part about this recipe is boiling and peeling the darn eggs. Seriously, it has taken me years to master this task! If you have already earned your hard-boiled egg scouts’ badge, feel free to skip over the following “how-to section.”

To achieve perfect eggs, rule number 1 is NOT to use super fresh eggs. If you bought the eggs that day – you are in serious trouble. That fresh egg is guaranteed to have more craters than if it were hit by an asteroid! I recommend using eggs that are about a week old, or, if in a bind, go purchase your eggs from the local convenient store down the street. I find they do not stock, as umm, frequently as the grocery store.

Place eggs in a large enough saucepan so that they have plenty of room in between them, then cover with enough cold water by at least an inch. Bring to a rolling boil over high heat. Once the water is boiling, reduce the heat to a medium boil and cook for an additional 10 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and place eggs in a bowl of iced water. (Think blanching!)  The ice is an important step, as it helps not only with the peeling, but it cools the eggs down fast enough to keep the yolk yellow – no green eggs here!  Chill for a few minutes until the egg is completely cooled.

Now let’s get to the moment of truth – peeling!  To peel, crack the egg on all sides and roll it between your hands and a hard surface to loosen the shell. I find that if you start at the larger end, that you will discover a little air pocket and it is easier to get a hold of the membrane. I also tend to shell the eggs under water. Not sure why that helps, but it sure seems to! Ok – that’s all I got.  I hope you all have 12 perfectly gorgeous eggs. Now on to the easy part of the recipe!

Combine boiling water and sun dried tomatoes in a bowl. Cover; let stand 30 minutes or until tender. Drain and set aside.

Cut eggs in half lengthwise; remove yolks. Place yolks in a medium bowl.  Add tomatoes, mayonnaise, and next 7 ingredients (through pepper); stir well. Place egg white halves onto your adorable deviled egg tray and spoon 1 1/2 teaspoons egg mixture into each egg white half. (Use a pastry bag to keep things neat!) Sprinkle with additional chopped parsley for a lovely presentation.

Yield: 2 dozen (serving size: 1/2 egg)

November 22, 2010

The Deviled Egg Tray – It’s a Southern Thing

by Crystal Cook

In the deep South, some things are just a given.  For instance, every type of soda is always (and I mean ALWAYS) a Coke®, all tea is sweet tea, and you always will find a deviled egg tray in the cupboard. Over the years, my deviled egg tray has brought me much joy.  At times when I could not get home to Georgia for the holidays, breaking out my tray and making a batch of eggs was a simple way to bring the spirit of home to me.

Below is my favorite twist on the southern deviled egg recipe. I highly suggest that you make them a part of your appetizer spread this Thanksgiving.

Enjoy, and now go call your momma!

Southern (as in the South of France)  Deviled Eggs

  • 12 hard-cooked large eggs, shelled
  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon chopped pitted kalamata olives
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 tablespoon chopped sun-dried tomatoes (dry, not packed in oil)
  • 2 teaspoons chopped capers
  • 1 teaspoon dried herbs de Provence
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1/4  teaspoon salt
  • 1/4  teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • Additional chopped fresh parsley for garnish

Ok, so the hardest part about this recipe is boiling and peeling the darn eggs. Seriously, it has taken me years to master this task! If you have already earned your hard-boiled egg scouts’ badge, feel free to skip over the following “how-to section.”

To achieve perfect eggs, rule number 1 is NOT to use super fresh eggs. If you bought the eggs that day – you are in serious trouble. That fresh egg is guaranteed to have more craters than if it were hit by an asteroid! I recommend using eggs that are about a week old, or, if in a bind, go purchase your eggs from the local convenient store down the street. I find they do not stock, as umm, frequently as the grocery store.

Place eggs in a large enough saucepan so that they have plenty of room in between them, then cover with enough cold water by at least an inch. Bring to a rolling boil over high heat. Once the water is boiling, reduce the heat to a medium boil and cook for an additional 10 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and place eggs in a bowl of iced water. (Think blanching!)  The ice is an important step, as it helps not only with the peeling, but it cools the eggs down fast enough to keep the yolk yellow – no green eggs here!  Chill for a few minutes until the egg is completely cooled.

Now let’s get to the moment of truth – peeling!  To peel, crack the egg on all sides and roll it between your hands and a hard surface to loosen the shell. I find that if you start at the larger end, that you will discover a little air pocket and it is easier to get a hold of the membrane. I also tend to shell the eggs under water. Not sure why that helps, but it sure seems to! Ok – that’s all I got.  I hope you all have 12 perfectly gorgeous eggs. Now on to the easy part of the recipe!

Combine boiling water and sun dried tomatoes in a bowl. Cover; let stand 30 minutes or until tender. Drain and set aside.

Cut eggs in half lengthwise; remove yolks. Place yolks in a medium bowl.  Add tomatoes, mayonnaise, and next 7 ingredients (through pepper); stir well. Place egg white halves onto your adorable deviled egg tray and spoon 1 1/2 teaspoons egg mixture into each egg white half. (Use a pastry bag to keep things neat!) Sprinkle with additional chopped parsley for a lovely presentation.

Yield: 2 dozen (serving size: 1/2 egg)

October 9, 2010

Ham and Egg “Muffins” with Red Pepper Coulis

by Sandy Pollock

This post is going to surprise Crystal. You see, my girl is a BIG egg fan, whereas I generally don’t go anywhere near them. I don’t hate eggs, but they are definitely not something I tend to wake up craving. But something in me has changed. For some reason, I, Sandy Pollock, have developed a liking for eggs. All of a sudden, a whole freaking world is open to me! I feel alive for the very first time! OK, maybe not, but I am enjoying this addition to my diet.

So I decided to try out the whole ham-product-lined-muffin-tin-filled-with-an-egg-in-the-middle thing. I liked the idea of a hand-held egg “muffin.” It sounded like a fun thing to eat. I customized it to my taste, which leans more toward a spicy palate, and I am really happy with the results. Let me ‘splain to you what I did.

First I nurtured my chicken until it gave me eggs. Then I — OK, that’s not true. I bought them at the grocery store. But then I did spectacular things with them! Here’s how it’s done:

Start by getting your ingredients together — in the world of french cooking, this is known as mise en place. ( I love when I remember something from my culinary school days!)

Dice one red bell pepper, two garlic cloves, and one jalapeno (remove seeds for less heat).

Melt a tablespoon (or so) of butter in a non-stick pan.

Then saute (over medium heat) those beautifully chopped veggies until softened (eh, let’s call it 5 minutes or so).

While the veggies are getting all soft and bothered, separate 6 eggs. Once the veggies are raring to go, add 1/2 of them to your egg whites and whisk ’em together well.

Spray your muffin tin with cooking spray and lay in a slice of smoked ham (sorry, I don’t have a photo for that step).

Then divide the egg white/veggie mixture between the 6 muffin slots and top each with an egg yolk.

Put these bad boys in a pre-heated 350 degree oven and cook until the eggs are set (about 15-20 minutes).

Now for the other half of the sautéed veggies. It’s time to make the coulis! Bust out your blender and add the other 1/2 of your veggies along with 1 tablespoon olive oil, 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar, 1/2 a shallot, and salt and pepper (to taste). Blend. Blend like you’ve never blended before!

Can’t really see the coulis, but I liked the picture and dang it — it’s my blog!

So one quick note. When you peek in on your eggs and see that those bad boys are almost set-up, pull them out and sprinkle each with some parmesan cheese. At this point, I also added several dashes of hot sauce to each muffin. I am currently in love with Goya hot sauce/salsa picante (you can see the bottle in the background of the first pic in this recipe). Loves it! Now place those guys back in the oven until the cheese melts (5 minutes or so).

I served my grub with some toasted Italian bread and a dollop of red pepper coulis. I also had the coulis in a bowl on the side, cuz folks are gonna want to dip their bread in there.

This is super yummy and easy and you can really change it up to suit your own taste. For instance, you could use prosciutto instead of smoked ham. You could add any filler you like — zucchini and tomatoes, or olives and feta. Go crazy!

Smooch!

%d bloggers like this: